Jenna on the set of Doctor Who (April 15, 2014).

Jenna on the set of Doctor Who (April 15, 2014).

(Source: jennalouisedaily)

(Source: misplacedbets)

(Source: coltycolt)

aikainkauna:

aikainkauna:

image

(Source: screenwack)

sheep-boy:

a ravenclaw inventing a spell like “ive enchanted this quill so that one dip in an inkwell and it will be able to draw from that inkwell until its out! no redipping!” and their muggle born friend just

"a…pen.you literally just used magic to make a pen" 

thetumblrofrassilon:

agrippina-minor:

Yup. That’s how it goes.

So many teeth.

thetumblrofrassilon:

agrippina-minor:

Yup. That’s how it goes.

So many teeth.

(Source: virgin-suicide-s)

skunkbear:

A couple months ago I shared some GIFs of invisible things, and I finally got around to putting them together in this video:

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.
Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound.  Special thanks to Mike Hargather, a professor of mechanical engineering at New Mexico Tech, who kindly provided a lot of these videos.

skunkbear:

A couple months ago I shared some GIFs of invisible things, and I finally got around to putting them together in this video:

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.

Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound.  Special thanks to Mike Hargather, a professor of mechanical engineering at New Mexico Tech, who kindly provided a lot of these videos.

ilikelookingatnakedmen:

historical-nonfiction:

Lectors, today meaning anyone who reads, used to a be a profitable job. Manual laborers would pool their money and hire a lector to read while they worked, keeping them entertained

Your own personal talk radio! 

ilikelookingatnakedmen:

historical-nonfiction:

Lectors, today meaning anyone who reads, used to a be a profitable job. Manual laborers would pool their money and hire a lector to read while they worked, keeping them entertained

Your own personal talk radio! 

(Source: dailynewsdig.com)

volatile-duchess:

lawnegbert:

you have to drag it a bit past the line until its off the post and  the cursor gets sucked into the fucking shadow realm

WHAT THE FUCK

volatile-duchess:

lawnegbert:

you have to drag it a bit past the line until its off the post and  the cursor gets sucked into the fucking shadow realm

WHAT THE FUCK

(Source: jaidefinichon)